Tag Archives: work ethic

Info Exchange – Seven Attributes of Work Ethic

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months
  • Simplifying mergers and acquisitions

Our information exchange this week highlights part 2 of the book, “Reviving Work Ethic: A Leader’s Guide to Ending Entitlement and Restoring Pride in the Emerging Workforce by Eric Chester.

 

Seven Attributes of Work Ethic

Work ethic is knowing what to do and doing it. It is marked by an individual’s positive attitude, reliability, professionalism, initiative, respect, integrity and gratitude. Instilling those seven attributes into the hearts and minds of the emerging workforce is the key to keeping our companies – and our country – stable and prosperous. Work ethic is the key to success!

 

Seven attributes of work ethic: 

 

1. Positive Attitude:

Provide employees with living examples of positive attitude in action and put them into situations that allow them to shadow people who model the attitudes desired.

 

2. Reliability:

Set clear expectations for each worker and then hold tight to those standards.

 

3. Professionalism:

It’s vitally important to clarify expectations for professionalism prior to hiring. Explain what it takes to succeed in the organization and give potential hires a chance to respond to make sure they are on the same page.

 

4. Initiative:

Initiative is relevant to the company because it prepares the worker for additional assignments and makes him or her invaluable to the employer. Even though they might not come begging for more work, employees want to know how they can contribute value to the company.

 

5. Respect:

Treat employees with the same degree of respect the organization would like from them and the actions will be mirrored.

 

6. Integrity:

Avoid scare tactics. Leaders have to trust their employees. Millenials hate to be micromanaged. If leaders clearly describe expectations and set high standards, but then constantly look over workers’ shoulders, employees will quickly feel as though they are not trusted.

 

7. Gratitude:

Unfortunately, employees can’t be taught gratitude. Leaders can define it and tell workers that they need to be grateful. They can tell them to smile, say thank you, and be nice to customers and co-workers. Like respect, employees need to embrace gratitude internally to make it last and to make it truly effective.

 

Figure out where employees are, what they feel, what matters to them and then tie things together. By meeting individuals where they are and giving them a reason to move where they want to go, a leader will build the type of work ethic desired in their employees. The shift in their mindsets away from a utilitarian view of work results in an increase in loyalty and decrease in turnover.

 

Loyalty Factor has customized programs to improve employee loyalty within your organization. Call us today to schedule an appointment with the Loyalty Expert – Dianne Durkin!

 

Info Exchange – Reviving Work Ethic

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months
  • Simplifying mergers and acquisitions

Our information exchange this week highlights the book, “Reviving Work Ethic: A Leader’s Guide to Ending Entitlement and Restoring Pride in the Emerging Workforce by Eric Chester.

Reviving Work Ethic

In February 2010, the PewResearchCenterreleased an extensive report titled “Millenials: A Portrait of Generation Next” that describes this generation (ages 18-29) as “confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat, and open to change.”

 

It is history’s first “always connected generation,” the report says, and it’s on track to become the “most educated generation in American history.”

 

We have an emerging workforce that embraces change, is better educated and more innovation-focused than any previous generation, and wants to change the world for the better. At the same time many question whether this generation identifies with work ethic.

 

Three key elements for generating work ethic values are:

  • Relevance. Members of the emerging workforce need to know the “why” before they will take action on the what. “Don’t just tell me what do,” They say (or think). “Tell me why I’m doing it.”
     
  • Reward. There are ways to build in incentives and rewards that encourage and reinforce positive behaviors and create habits that become the building blocks for excellence. Business leaders can create a reward structure that promotes a positive work ethic, not just incentives for those who achieve above-and-beyond excellence.
     
  • Radiate. The most powerful values of an organization are radiated throughout the culture. The key to radiating values is to spread them through teams and organizations.

 

Loyalty Factor has conducted numerous presentation and workshops on how to manage and integrate the newest generation in the workforce. Call Loyalty Factor today to further discuss your workforce dynamics!