Tag Archives: Efficiency

Info Exchange – Creating Sustainable Performance

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months
  • Simplifying mergers and acquisitions

Our information exchange this week highlights the Harvard Business Review article, Creating Sustainable Performance by Gretchen Spreitzer and Christine Porath.

Creating Sustainable Performance

 

According to the Harvard Business Review article, creating sustainable organization performance is the result of thriving employees. These employees are not just satisfied and employed, they are engaged in creating the future.

 

The authors found that people who fit this description demonstrated 16% better overall performance, 125% less burnout, 32% more commitment to the organization and 46% more job satisfaction than their peers.

 

Thriving employees have two components: Vitality, or the sense of being alive, excited, and learning; and Growth that comes from gaining knowledge and skills. Some people naturally build vitality and learning into their jobs, but most employees are influenced by their environment.

 

According to the authors, four mechanisms create the conditions for thriving:

  • Having decision-making discretion
  • Sharing information about the organization and its strategy
  • Minimizing impoliteness
  • Offering clear, concise, and consistent performance feedback 

 

To learn how you can develop an environment that engages your employees in creating the future contact Loyalty Factor at 603-334-3401, or read Dianne Durkin’s new book, “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s Time to Get R.E.A.L.” where the E stands for Engaging, Empowering, and Enriching Employees for Increased Earnings.

Leadership Secret Weapon Series: Reframing Techniques

Have you ever had a situation where you have had to change another person’s perception? For example you had to give them bad news, or you had to handle an objection, or make a difficult decision. We have all been in these situations where we may have to give bad news.

 

Reframing is a critical skill that provides a flexible approach to changing perceptions with a particular problem or situation. It’s giving the situation a different meaning which leads to a different behavioral response.

 

There are four primary reframing techniques:

 

1)      Redefining: Expanding or narrowing the topic.

2)      Metaphor: Describing the topic’s likeness to something else that is familiar to create a better understanding of the current situation.

3)      Story: Using an example such as a story of a similar situation where the new approach had been tried.

4)      Spin: Creating positive and/or negative interpretation of the issue.  

 

The following story is an example of reframing (Steven Covey).

 

Story: You are on the subway with 3 obnoxious kids who are running all over the place and making lots of noise. You see that they are with their father and wait for him to do something to stop them. When he doesn’t after several minutes you finally speak up and tell him that you find his children incredibly annoying and obnoxious. He responds “Yes, they’ve been that way since their mother died last week. I don’t know what to do.”

 

Critical Point: The fact that the kids are annoying and obnoxious doesn’t change, but your perception of them does based on this new information.

 

Utilizing reframing strategies will help resolve conflict and difficult situations, in order to change perceptions and move forward smoothly.

 

Every problem has in it the seeds of its own solution. 
If you don’t have any problems, you don’t get any seeds.
– Norman Vincent Peale

 

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people.  www.loyaltyfactor.com

Keeping Employees Engaged in Downturn Economy


Opportunity for Growth

 

How can your business turn
this around and establish
engaged, committed
and loyal employees
who give 100 percent to the
success and profitability
of the organization?  

 

 

 

 Here are some suggestions: 

  •  Build a culture that will stimulate employees and create an upwardly mobile environment for growth and prosperity.

 

  • A culture based on trust, freedom, responsibility and accountability within a framework.

 

  • A culture in which people are willing to go the extra mile and perhaps go to extreme lengths to fulfill their responsibilities and take on new responsibilities.

 

  • It’s a culture in which people are self-directed versus one in which people look to an authority figure for complete direction.

 

In a responsibility-based culture trust is essential. Managers and employees practice the elements of trust, including straightforwardness, openness, acceptance and reliability. When these four elements are present, respect is high and people are valued. Rewards and recognition systems exist. People are rewarded for their results, recognized for their performance. Everyone seeks the highest level of excellence by being the best they can be and helping others maximize their strengths to be the best they can be.

 

In my next blog, I will discuss specific ways leaders and managers can build a responsibility-based culture.

 

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people.  www.loyaltyfactor.com

Employee Engagement in Downturn Economy

With the business climate being very volatile and complex, it’s no surprise that enthusiastic employees can become disillusioned and slip down the scale from highly engaged to actively disengaged.  As a business owner and leader, you must build what I call a responsibility-based culture that is stimulating, upwardly mobile, and based on trust, freedom and accountability.

 

 

The Gallup Organization’s research has revealed three types of employees:

 

  • Engaged – 29%
  • Not Engaged – 55%
  • Actively Disengaged – 16%

 

The Engaged Employees (Wow, a real small percentage!):  

 

  • Consistent levels of high performance as natural innovators
  • They are energetic and enthusiastic individuals who never run out of things to do.
  • They create more work for themselves within their area of expertise and are committed to the company and their team
  • They accept accountability and responsibility for their actions.

 

The Not-engaged Employees:

 

  • Focus on doing just enough to keep their job
  • Are non-risk takers
  • Have low commitment to the organization
  • Don’t feel a sense of connection with their organization or their manager
  • Are not energized for exemplary job achievement
  • Become more focused on the steps involved in doing their job rather than the results achieved.

 

The Actively Disengaged Employees:

 

  • Unhappy at work and show their unhappiness.  
  • Thrive on the problems vs. the solution, and spread their discontent to their colleagues.

 

These unbelievable results indicate thatU.S.businesses are operating at one-third of their capacity. This would be similar to having only one-third of a bank’s branches opened each day – can you imagine that? Or one-third of a manufacturing company’s machines operated at capacity every day? Or only one-third of all emergency rooms accepted critically ailing patients on any given day?

 

The lost opportunity is obvious.  The opportunity for growth is tremendous!!

 

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people.  www.loyaltyfactor.com

Creating a Culture of Commitment – within a Multigenerational Workplace

In my previous Blog I discussed the specific attributes of each generation in a multi-generational workplace.

In this Blog I want to talk about how to attract, retain, motivate and lead a multi-generational workplace to reap benefits and increase corporate profitability.

With this broad field of individuals populating the corporate world, it becomes challenging to describe the “typical” workforce, let alone manage and maximize its talent assets toward higher productivity and profits.

Recruiting is the first hurdle. Over the long haul, retention is the highest hurdle by far. Learning and development can provide the competitive boost that allows organizations to clear these hurdles in the race for talent and, ultimately, win employee loyalty and commitment.

Recent studies show 85 percent of the workforce want to continually improve and grow. The difference today is that if employees don’t learn and grow, they seek other opportunities.

The current workforce—particularly the younger members just beginning to chart their careers—will move on quickly if they are not being challenged, valued, and developed. In this context, organizational leaders must focus on applying the lessons of employee engagement to the design and delivery of every learning and development initiative across the enterprise.

Here are some tips for leaders

  • Boomers have been recognized for their extended work hours and can not separate work and home lives.  They have an insatiable drive.
  • Nexters are reminiscent of the Veterans who built the American economic landscape after World War II.  As the product of more affluent times, Nexters are motivated by learning and want to see immediate results. They are known to assess each situation by asking themselves, “Why is that important today?”
  • Veterans love to share their knowledge and tell stories. Coupling Veterans and Nexters creates enormous payoffs.
  • In the work environment, Nexters want structure, guidance and direction from their bosses without micromanagement. Explain the task and provide them the flexibility to make it happen.
  • Unlike their elders, Nexters will not be lured by promises of climbing ladders, paying dues or cashing out at retirement. Customized training, mentoring, incentives, responsibility and flexibility will be a necessity for this generation.
  • Whether born in 1950 or 1980, when people are happy at work, they are more productive, creative, innovative and bring forth new ideas for the well being and future success of the organization they work for.
     

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people.  www.loyaltyfactor.com

Juggling the Generations – Managing Multi-Generational Workplace

Have you looked around your office lately?

Do you share cubicles and offices with Boomers and Gen Y’s and everyone in between? Is your supervisor half your age?

Never before has there been such a diversity of generations in the workforce. Four distinct age-based cohorts, each with different values, needs and motivators create many challenges for today’s workplace.

Gen Xers and Nexters combined — the 18 to 41 year olds — make up about 45 percent of the workforce.  Baby Boomers represent another 45 percent. Veterans make up the final 10 percent.

Although there is danger in generalizing, here’s a quick review of each group’s typical traits. More importantly, I want to reveal a glimpse of what individuals in each cohort might be looking for from their workplace.  

Veterans (1922–1944): Born before World War II, their values were shaped by the Great Depression, the New Deal, WWII and the Korean War and emphasize civic pride, loyalty, respect for authority, dedication, sacrifice, conformity, honor, and discipline.

In the workforce, this group is the stable, loyal and hard-working — seeking clearly defined goals, directions and measurements designated by the leader.

Baby Boomers (1945–1963): Raised in an era of extreme optimism, opportunity and progress, their values were shaped by landing on the moon, the Peace Corps, the Vietnam War, Woodstock and the Civil Rights movement.

As a group, they’ve always been determined to do better than their parents and provide their children with everything their hearts desire. They will go the extra mile on the job. They proved this by being the inventors of the 60-hour workweek. In many cases, they achieve their identity through their work.

Xers (1964–1979): The Xers came of age during the economic wars of the 1970s and 1980s. Often left to fend for themselves by working parents, they were plugged in for much of their childhood — surfing the Web, playing video games, watching MTV. In the process, they developed a chronic need for stimulation and instant gratification.

In the work environment, Xers have a huge distaste for micromanagement. They want to be told what is expected of them, provided with appropriate feedback and empowered to get the job done. They want to work on their own terms and balance their lives: the upshot for them is flexibility.

Nexters (1980–2000): Nexters were raised in a high-tech world that shaped their entire value system. Unlike the latchkey kids of the ‘70s, many of these recent graduates have grown up in households with hyper-involved parents and overscheduled lives. They are used to being both seen and heard.

In the workforce, if they don’t like something, or they don’t think something is being done correctly, they have no hesitation in making their views known, whether it is their boss, boss’s boss or the CEO. Although viewed by many in the workforce as lacking a strong work ethic and having an unjustified sense of entitlement, they have a very positive, can-do attitude about getting the job done well and efficiently.

 Also available:

My newly released White Paper

that explores this topic further:

Age of Change:
Managing, Motivating and Integrating Your Multigenerational Workforce

 

In my next Blog, I will discuss how to attract, retain and motivate a multi-gen workforce – turning them into loyal, productive employees that will help increase profitability.

 

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people.  www.loyaltyfactor.com