Tag Archives: Culture

Recruit and Retain the Right People in the Right Place at the Right Time

 

Continuing from our last entry on recruiting and retaining, let’s outline some specific actions leaders can take to ensure great hires! 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are going to recruit the right people at the right time in the right place, here are some things you have to focus on when you are hiring:

 

Culture – Think about the characteristics of the people who thrive in your organization.

 

Attitude – There are many things we can teach.  Attitude is not one of them.  You want to hire people who are “positive on life”, self-directed and who are accountable and responsible for their actions.

 

Self-directed people – make choices and accept the consequences of their choices.  These are the people who, when they are wrong, own up to it, accept responsibility and  are accountable for their actions.

 

Competence – Make sure you involve the right people in the interview process, so you can really drill down on all areas of competence from communication and management skills to technical skills. 

 

Taking these focus points into consideration will help you and your organization ensure your new hires will integrate well into your culture and set them up for success.

 

 

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people.  www.loyaltyfactor.com

Info Exchange – Change the Culture, Change the Game

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 
Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months

Our information exchange this week highlights the book, “Change the Culture, Change the Game: The Breakthrough Strategy for Energizing Your Organization and Creating Accountability for Results” by Roger Connors and Tom Smith.

 

Mastering the ability to accelerate culture change is an essential core competency for every leader who wants to keep his or her organization competitive and focused. Organizational culture is defined as the way people think and act. 

For the change process to have maximum effectiveness, accountability is key. With accountability, people at every level of the organization embrace their role in facilitating the change and demonstrate the ownership needed for making true progress, both for themselves and their organization.

In this book the authors state “Beliefs about how work should get done affects what people do.” They outline three essential change components:

  • Experiences which foster beliefs
  • Beliefs which influence actions
  • Actions which product results 

According to the authors, if you:

  • Change people’s beliefs about how they should do their daily work,
  • Help them adopt the new beliefs you want them to hold,
  • You will produce the actions you want them to take! 

Effective leaders understand that beliefs drive people’s actions in the organization. When people see leaders reinforcing beliefs, everyone gets the message that “I ought to be doing that too,” which directly affects culture change.

To enroll an entire organization in change the authors state:

  1. Start with accountability – clearly define results.
  2. Get people ready for the change – Describe the process.
  3. Begin with the top and then proceed to enact teams.
  4. Engage and Involve Individuals – when people are co-creators of the culture it will be easier to implement. 

In summary:

  • Experience fosters beliefs
  • Beliefs influence actions
  • Actions produce results

 

Info Exchange – The Inspiring Leader

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 
Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months

Our information exchange this week highlights the book “The Inspiring Leader: Unlocking the Secrets of How Extraordinary Leaders Motivate,” by John Zenger, Joseph Folkman and Scott Edinger.  

  Unlocking the Secrets of How
Extraordinary Leaders Motivate

Research shows that inspiration is the most powerful of all leadership competencies. It is the best predictor of overall ratings or leadership effectiveness by direct reports, peers and managers. It is the quality most valued by employees and the factor most correlated with employee commitment and satisfaction.

 

The Inspiring Leader reveals numerous principles and behaviors top leaders use to build an emotional connection between themselves and their teams.

 

Below are 6 things to do to become an inspiring leader: 

  1. Inspire and Motivate with Energy and Enthusiasm. Researchers found that leaders with these qualities tend to have direct reports who are more satisfied and committed overall. Such leaders are also better able to retain employees, especially their highly committed employees.
     
  2. Create a Vision and Provide Clear Direction. The importance of a clear, concise and compelling vision and direction cannot be overstated. This is not a “solo” activity for the leader. Nor does this need to be for an entire corporation. Senior and middle managers from cross functional areas can do this quite effectively. The vision combines a strong statement of the guiding principles that shape the organization with a vivid picture of what the organization aspires to be in the next few years.
     
  3. Set Stretch Personal Goals. Extraordinary leaders recognize their strengths and their areas for development. Many books recommend leaders work on their areas for development. The problem with this approach is that typically people are not interested in or passionate about their weaknesses and therefore they don’t improve much. The key for improvement is passion. Working on an area that you are interested in creates a much higher probability of success.
     
  4. Be a Good Communicator. Research shows that inspirational leaders: 1) Seek opportunities to communicate, 2) Expand the volume and frequency of communication, and 3) Communicate passion and enthusiasm.
     
  5. Create Positive Development Experiences for the Team. To develop subordinates, inspirational leaders: 1) Give coaching, 2) Provide actionable feedback, 3) Delegate in a manner that develops people, 4) Structure the job with development as the objective, and 5) Make developmental experiences available (classes, courses, trips, site visits and benchmarking opportunities.)
     
  6. Develop a Collaborative Culture. The culture has to become one of putting the organization’s and the team’s interests higher than anyone’s self interest, no matter how senior the person is in the organization. Ideas and proposals have to be evaluated on their merits, not on the role power or position that their proponent holds in the organization.

In summary, when the right environment is created and combined with the expectation that everyone will contribute to the innovation process, then a steady stream of good ideas for new products, services, marketing techniques and ways to better manage the business come forth on a regular basis.

 

Info Exchange – Building a Collaborative Enterprise

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 
Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months

Our information exchange this week highlights the Harvard Business Review Article, “Building a Collaborative Enterprise,” by Paul Alder, Charles Heckscher and Laurence Prusak.    

 

Four keys to creating a culture of trust and teamwork.

 

How can you build a collaborative enterprise? The authors Paul Alder, Charles Heckscher and Laurence Prusak highlight there are four keys to creating a culture of trust and teamwork.  

 

Trust is the foundation and framework of all relationships. The level of trust and respect one creates determines their success with everyone they are dealing with. In creating mechanisms to make trust scalable across the organization, is what this article highlights. Specifically the authors state that organizations must do four things:    
 

  1. Define a shared purpose that guides what people at all levels of the organization are trying to achieve together.
     
  2. Cultivate an ethic of contribution in which the highest value is provided to people who look beyond their specific roles and advance the common purpose of the organization.
     
  3. Develop scalable procedures for coordinating people’s efforts so that management activities become interdependent.
     
  4. Create an infrastructure in which an individual’s sphere of influence is overlapped and the person is rewarded and valued for the collaboration between the various functions within the organization.

 

The authors feel these four goals are imperative in building a culture of trust and innovation.