Monthly Archives: December 2013

Finding the Next Steve Jobs – Part 2

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months
  • Simplifying mergers and acquisitions

 

KEEPING and NURTURING the NEXT STEVE JOBS

Our last info exchange focused on hiring creatives to keep your organization afloat through changes.  In the second part of this info exchange, we will take a look at the ‘next steps’ once you’ve managed to lure the creatives to your company.  In Finding the Next Steve Jobs, Nolan Bushnell and Gene Stone address how to retain the creatives who are so critical to your success.

 

  1. Champion Bad Ideas and Celebrate Future – If people are reluctant to suggest bad ideas, they are absolutely terrified of failure.  And if they’re terrified of failure, they likely won’t succeed.  Your company must make failure a tenable option.  Fear of failure creates an organization that says no to every new idea.
  2. Require Risk – Many of the greatest advances in science, exploration, medicine and business would never have occurred if someone hadn’t been willing to walk into unchartered territory.  With the business environment changing so quickly, companies have to be innovative to survive even if that means changing their risk-averse culture.  Taking a risk shouldn’t be considered an option in the 21st century.  It’s a necessity.
  3. Mentor – By definition, creatives are always working on something that’s different, innovative and new.  All companies must make sure someone is supporting their creatives; someone who is reassuring, clear and who can help them stay on track.  The mentor stops the creatives from feeling so rejected and lonely that their work suffers and offers to fight bureaucracy, even if she doesn’t understand the product.
  4. Create a Creative Chain –To ensure that creativity flourishes, examine if and how creative ideas bubble to the top at your company.  Is there a chain of command that nurtures and promotes them? Or is there a chain that drags them down?
  5. Change Every Day, Every Hour – Design an environment for your creatives that makes their brains work harder, think differently, invent interestingly.  The greater the uniformity, the greater the sameness.  The greater the change, the greater the difference.
  6. Mix It Up – Get your creatives out in the field with the salespeople.  Invite your accountants into a creative meeting.  This teaches employees to appreciate the processes and work of other departments and colleagues, and creativity soars.

 

If you can fix your company’s bureaucracy, streamline your creative train, establish a workplace where innovation is rewarded and naysayers are denied power, you may well be fashioning a workplace that cultivates creativity.  All the companies that are known for being innovative ACT.  If you want to be successful, act on as many of those great ideas as you can!  Some will fail, but the ones that succeed can change the trajectory of your business.

 

Dianne Durkin of Loyalty Factor offers a dynamic keynote presentation entitled Unleashing Innovation and Creativity which is loaded with insightful ideas to elevate the creativity in your organization.  To book Dianne for your next corporate meeting, contact Loyalty Factor at 603.334.3401.

 

An Employee Would Work an Extra Week for an Incentive Program

CommunicatingEmployees Would Work an Extra Week for an Incentive Program

Staples Advantage, the business-to-business division of Staples, Inc., released the results of a survey that found one-third of office workers would be willing to put in an extra week of work each year if it meant their company would implement an incentive program. Respondents at companies that already have such programs say they are:

• More Valued (85%)
• Happier and More Motivated at Work (70%)
• More Loyal to their Company (65%)
• More Productive and able to get Better Results (60%)

A staggering 70% of employees at companies without incentive programs say they’d love to work for a company that has one. In addition to working an extra week each year, these employees would be willing to make other sacrifices if it meant their company would implement an incentive program – 30% say they would take on extra responsibilities, and more than 40% would be in favor of forgoing the annual holiday party.

What is your organization doing to implement incentive programs? For help in implementing creative, cost effective programs, contact Loyalty Factor at 603-334-3401.

ESM: Engagement Strategies Magazine, Nov/Dec 2011

DD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011

 

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s Time to Get R.E.A.L.”

The Enemy of Engagement

Business People Group

‘Frustration isn’t an employee issue; it’s an organizational issue.’

 

Frustrated employees represent 20% or more of the total workforce, leading to a major loss in performance, talent and revenue.  Frustration wears down motivated, dedicated employees who really care about their jobs and can’t get the organizational support they need to get things done.

 

According to Mary Royal and Tom Agnew, the authors of The Enemy of Engagement, “Frustrated employees really want to succeed in their role and become aggravated by organizational barriers or a lack of resources.  Managers must ask the right questions and address the issue promptly, or risk losing top talent who care deeply about the organization.”

 

Frustration isn’t just an employee issue, it’s an organizational issue, adding that “Managers must listen for clues and serve as the voice for frustrated employees.”

 

To learn how to engage and empower  by utilizing empathetic listening to identify the frustration in your workforce and to increase performance and profits, contact Loyalty Factor at 603-334-3401.

 

DDD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011ianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s Time to Get R.E.A.L.”