Monthly Archives: March 2013

Info Exchange – The Price of Incivility

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months
  • Simplifying mergers and acquisitions

  

Our information exchange this week highlights the recent article in Harvard Business Review, “The Price of Incivility” by Christine Porath and Christine Pearson  

 

 The Price of Incivility

Rudeness at work is rampant and it is on the rise. The authors believe this chips away at the bottom line because nearly everybody who experiences workplace incivility responds in a negative way.

 

Employees are less creative when they are disrespected and in many cases may get fed up and leave.

 

According to the article about half decrease their effort or lower the quality of their work. Incivility also damages customer relationships. The research by the two authors shows that people are less likely to buy from a company with an employee they perceive as rude, whether the rudeness is directed at the customer or another employee.

 

After collecting data from more than 14,000 people in the United States and Canada, the conclusion is incivility is expensive and few organizations recognize or take actions to curtail it.

 

A poll of 800 managers and employees in 700 industries showed with incivility. Below are some statistics on the cost of incivility:

  • 48% intentionally decreased their work effort
  • 47% intentionally decreased their time spent at work
  • 38% intentionally decreased the quality of their work
  • 80% lost work time worrying about the incident
  • 63% lost work time avoiding the offender
  • 66% said their performance declined
  • 78% said their commitment to the organization declined
  • 12% said they left their job because of the uncivil treatment
  • 25% admitted to taking their frustrations out on customers

It takes a lot of vigilance to keep the workplace civil. Managers can use several strategies to keep their own behavior in check and to foster civility among others.

 

Below are some of the strategies:

 

     1. Manage Yourself

     2. Model Good Behavior

     3. Ask for Feedback on your Behavior

     4. Hire for Civility

     5. Create Group Norms

     6. Reward Good Behavior

     7. Conduct Post Departure Interviews

 

The message is very clear. Just one habitual offensive employee can cost the organization in lost employees, lost customers and lost productivity.

 

To foster civility in your organization and reduce the impact of incivility, contact Loyalty Factor for aide in improving your organizational relationships! 

Recognition Programs: How to Be Effective

Keeping employees motivated has never been as important as during the current economic downturn. As companies reduce their workforces, employees need to work at optimal levels to ensure increased productivity and profitability.

 

Now more than ever, organizations must be proactive and have the right strategies in place to keep employees motivated.

 

Valued employees who feel appreciated for their hard work and efforts are more engaged in their organization, therefore demonstrate high productivity and efficiency.

 

To be effective, all rewards and recognition must be:

 

  • Timely.  Recognition should be as immediate as possible.  If you don’t thank someone until long after the effort, it diminishes the importance and sincerity.

 

  • Continual.  It should be an ongoing part of your culture. Don’t make rewards seem like after-thoughts.

 

  • Customized.  Rewards and recognition need to make sense in your culture and to your employees.

 

  • Balanced.  Think about appropriate levels of gratitude for the action you are recognizing. For example, offering a gift certificate to say thank you for a job well done and something more substantial when someone has achieved a milestone for the organization.

 

Info Exchange – A Golden Age for Working Women

Welcome to the Loyalty Factor Information Exchange, a bi-weekly service providing summaries of major publications and books on various management and customer relationship topics. 

 Loyalty Factor has been instrumental in helping companies:

  • Increase Customer Satisfaction by 20 – 33%
  • Increase Revenues by 50% in 18 months
  • Increase Manufacturing Production by 200% in 18 months
  • Simplifying mergers and acquisitions

 Our information exchange this week highlights the recent article in Forbes, “A Golden Age for Working Women” by Jenna Goudreau

  

 A Golden Age for Working Women

 

As the world job market struggles to rebound from the depths of the Great Recession, one thing that’s not getting as much attention as it used to is how long-term employment trends are changing – and that not everyone may find a job even when the pace of recovery hits its stride again.

 

In the new knowledge economy, physical and manufacturing jobs have slowly disappeared. Computers disrupted once stable occupations like postal service and administrative work. And it may be just the beginning.

 

Because technology is improving at such a rapid rate, many now-familiar computer industry jobs will soon be automated as well. The jobs that survive all this change will be those a robot or a piece of software cannot do, requiring social skills, eye contact and a personal touch.

 

As we move toward a service economy, skills like communication and collaboration will move to the forefront. These are skills that most women possess. British futurist Ian Pearson calls this “The Care Economy.”

 

Women tend to excel at showing empathy, compassion and teaching others. As we move into the care economy, women will find many jobs easier to survive in.

 

Dianne Durkin of Loyalty Factor specializes in helping organizations excel by capitalizing on the personal touch! Contact Loyalty Factor today to schedule a consult to improve upon your organization’s soft skills.

Appreciation Creates Bottom-line Results

“Appreciate everything your associates do for the business.

Nothing else can quite substitute for a few well-chosen,

well-timed and sincere words of praise. 

They’re absolutely free and worth a fortune.”

 ~ Sam Walton

 

Once you have engaged, empowered, and enriched employees lives, you have their attention. To have their heart, they need to feel appreciated, rewarded, recognized and valued.

 

To maintain your skilled workforce and your loyal and engaged employees, it is important to make sure your employees know their efforts matter.  Appreciation comes in all forms, shapes and sizes.  The best meet the specific needs of the individual. 

 

Sometimes a $5 gift certificate to Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts or McDonalds — or a simple chocolate bar — can put a huge smile on someone’s face and energize them with more than just a sugar high.  It is amazing to see people light up.  It is the simple things that make a difference.  The simplest and most inexpensive are often words. 

 

Thank you!

 Great Job!

 I really appreciate all your work!

 

It’s the small things that can really make your day or even your week. Usually it’s a gesture from someone acknowledging something you have done. Small things do matter. If you do not believe it, just get into the habit of thanking people and see what happens.