Employee Loyalty

Questions for Implementing Change

 

 

Type of Leaders

Are you thinking about Change?

Managers implementing incremental change – changes that happen within the context of business as usual – are responsible for making sure the reasons, details, benefits and impact of the change are all mapped out prior to implementation.

I recently developed a list of questions for managers to consider:

REASONS:

  • What is the change?
  • Why is this change needed?
  • What will happen if we do not make the change?
  • What are the benefits of making the change?

BENEFITS:

  • How will the change benefit the organization?
  • Who will benefit from the changes?
  • When will the positive benefits be felt?

IMPACT:

  • Who will be impacted by the proposed changes?
  • What risks are involved in going forward with the changes?
  • Who will suffer from the changes?
  • Will any jobs be eliminated?
  • Who needs to be informed of the changes?
  • What will be different because of the change?
  • Who is losing? And what?

PROCESS:

  • What steps are needed in making the change?
  • How can I manage the changes so they are successful?
  • Who do I need to involve?
  • What is the best mode of communication to present changes?

A good change management process offers a clear message, emotional buy-in, targeting the appropriate people, timely delivery, and an open line of two way communication between all involved.  Before you begin making changes, be sure to ask yourself all the questions.  It’ll make everything smoother!

Dianne Durkin, President of Loyalty Factor, offers training and personal coaching with particular emphasis on building relational capital.  Contact Loyalty Factor (www.loyaltyfactor.com) today at dmdurkin@loyaltyfactor.com to schedule your session and get moving forward towards building a strong personal brand!

Your Inner Leader

Your “Inner Leader” by Robert Landau

Are you a leader in your life?

A leader envisions a task, and then goes about accomplishing that task in the best way they can.  Motivational leadership happens when others watch a leader facilitating a task and admire the way they go about it and the results they’ve gotten.

Each one of us has an “Inner Leader”.  It comes to the fore when we stand out of its way.  It has everything to do with confidence and positivity.  If you let your “Inner Leader” lead you in life, you will reach the finish line even before you realize that you’ve gotten there.  Leadership is a part of your heartbeat, it’s a part of your breath and it’s who and what you are.

Here are seven easy-to-follow steps to life leadership:

  1. Believe there is a leader within you.
  2. Map out how you will get from A to Z for any task that requires leadership
  3. Believe you can get there
  4. Feel what it’s like already accomplishing the task even though it hasn’t happened yet
  5. Repeat step 4 as often as possible until the results are achieved
  6. Stand out of the way and let it happen
  7. Don’t worry about WHEN your goal will be achieved, just KNOW it will happen when it is supposed to.

Leading is something you came here to do.  It’s your path, it’s your life, it’s your destiny.  All you have to do is stand out of the way!

Dianne Durkin offers personal coaching services and leadership programs to guide individuals to tune into their “Inner Leader”.  Contact Loyalty Factor today to schedule your coaching or training sessions.  603.334.3401

 

Source: RobertLandauMotivation.com, August 31, 2013

Can’t Buy Me Like

As John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote a half century ago, “Money can’t buy you love.”   “Can’t Buy Me Like”  by Bob Garfield and Doug Levy introduces us to the “Relationship Era,” where the only path for business seeking long-term success is to create authentic customer relationships.  Where do “authentic customer relationships” come from?  The answers are honesty, transparency, shared values and a purpose beyond profit.

Relationship Era marketing is not awareness, nor even quality, it is authenticity.  Trust. Loyalty. Pride.  Relationship Era marketers do not see purchases as conquests to seduce, or even persuade.  They see them as friends – members of a community dedicated not only to the same stuff but also to the same ideals.

Trust is now the basis for everything.  The three C’s of trust:

  • Credibility – A brand must deliver on the terms of their offer.
  • Care – Caring about consumers means actually caring about their lives and constructing your business to be as helpful as possible.
  • Congruency – Find common cause with individuals on the same wavelength.

The journey from the Consumer Era to the Relationship Era is called “the Shift.”  This “Shift” is from traditional marketing to purposeful marketing.  The process begins with assembling the team and posing one central question: Why does the brand exist?  It’s with a parallel question: If this brand disappeared from the face of the earth tomorrow, would anybody but financially interested parties care?  Brands need to re-evaluate who they are, what they stand for and why they are in business in the first place.

In summary, goodwill can be accumulated over time by fostering a relationship exactly akin to ones with friends and loved ones.  That means sharing relevant content that may have nothing to do with your brand per se but everything to do with the overlaps of interest between you and your public.

Loyalty Factor specializes in guiding leaders as they transition to Relationship Era marketing and seek to develop long-term relationships founded in trust.  To learn more about our programs and mentoring, visit www.loyaltyfactor.com or call 603.334.3401.

 

 

DD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011 Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership“.

Generation Z Dreams BIg

socially-responsibleMoney.com just recently published an article “The Surprising Thing Gen Z Wants to Do with its Money” and I was happy to read “an astounding 97% of post-millennials believe they will one day own a home; 82% say it is the most important part of the American dream”.
This can be attributed to several things – including growing up during a recession, the wisdom of parents who include their children in financial discussions, and the new drive in education to set kids free with more of a foundation in money matters.
The article goes on to divulge that “three in five teens have already begun saving” – a very impressive feat.
Dreams of owning a home and dedication to saving lend themselves to the assumption that members of Gen Z’s career goals will be motivated by money. Research shows the contrary. As we begin to learn more and more about the aspirations of Gen Z, their entrepreneurial spirit shines through. They value honesty, in-person communication, and a manager who listens more than a higher salary.
As we begin to see Gen Z in the workforce, it’s important to remember, they’re motivated, they have dreams, and they have needs. As managers we need to be aware and responsive to these needs.

Dianne DDD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011urkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s

Do you have the characteristics of an effective leader?

 

GenY

Brad Lebo recently published an article in NHBR’s Business Services Guide 2015 titled, “Do you have what it takes to be a good leader?”

His article highlights 9 characteristics of effective and sustainable leadership and I felt it would be a good exercise to see if you have what it takes. Ask yourself, do I????

1. Have the courage to imagine and act on a vision, reject the status quo and take risk?
2. Can I quiet doubt and worry?
3. Do I care for the interests of self?
4. Do I care for the interests of others?
5. Am I able to navigate competing interests?
6. Do I know how to benefit from feedback from a partner or team?
7. Do I know how to hold myself and others accountable to reasonable goals?
8. Can I effectively communicate a vision to others?
9. Do I possess the ability to influence and motivate others?

Focus on those characteristics where you feel you fall short. Nailing them all is the sign of a great leader!

Dianne Durkin isDD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011 president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s

Essence of Trust

 We all seek to be trusted and are attracted to those we trust.  But it begs the question, what is the essence of trust? 

Trust is about safety.  The presence of trust, in organizations, creates the feeling of confidence – a secure knowledge that our behavior, our work and our performance will be evaluated in an objective, rational and consistent way.  It means we need not fear a subjective, arbitrary or personal attack that would threaten our reputation or stability within the organization – or worse, our self-esteem. 

Trust is the comfort of knowing we’ll be treated fairly if we simply do the right thing.  What solidifies this feeling of safety is experiencing it consistently, to the point where it is predictable.  We can count on it.  Then, and only then, are we freed up and fired up to do our best work.

How do we build a trustful place of our followers?  As Barry Posner writes in Leadership Challenge, when it comes to building trust:Team Huddle

  • Leaders must “go first” – you must model the way.
  • Leaders should always act trustworthy – this creates trust.

Don’t wait for others to demonstrate their trustworthiness for you to trust them.  Embrace your role as a leader and be the trustworthy model that leads the way!

 

DD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011

Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s Time to Get R.E.A.L.

Information Exchange – Being A Persuasive

 

People who try to persuade others usually think to say please and thank you, but it takes much more than that to overcome the most significant obstacle: resistance.  In his book “Being a Persuasive”, Ken O’Quinn acknowledges resistance is at the heart of persuasion; without it, there Is usually no need for persuasion.

Here are some tips to handle resistance:

1. Acknowledge the Resistance – If the audience is already resistant, be candid about it and address it up front. Say, “I realize you might be reluctant to,” or “I understand your concerns about.” By treating their opinions with respect, you are validating their feelings and opinions, and the empathy helps to create an emotional connection.

2. Change the Frame of Reference – People evaluate information differently depending on which element they are focusing on.  You can rearrange the elements of your proposal to emphasize the positive attributes.  When people eating hamburgers were told that the meat was 75 percent lean, they gave it a higher grade than did a second group (eating the same meat), which was told that the meat contained only 25 percent fat.

3. Change the Comparison – People evaluate options with a comparison point in mind, and you often can persuade them to accept an offer depending on what they are comparing it with.  For example, a group was having a difficult time selling cookies for $.75, so it puts on its sign “reduced from $1 to 75 cents,” and it sold many more.

4. Remove the Audience’s Reluctance – LL Bean outdoor clothing and sporting goods dealer built a global reputation on its satisfaction-guaranteed customer service.  Among other things, customers can return produces, even without a sales receipt.  This guarantee provides an assurance to the customer who might be hesitating to buy but decides to do it, thinking, “I can always return it.”

5. Demonstrate Your Credibility – People often decide how to respond to a persuasive appeal based not on the content of the message but on whether they view the communicator as credible.  And two factors people use to judge credibility are expertise and trustworthiness.  Communicate your expertise in your message.  This can include citing well-known experts in the field.  When you refer to credible sources, your message becomes more persuasive.

Call Loyalty Factor at 603-334-3401 today to schedule an in-house training program: Tackling Resistance and create a culture of engagement in your organization!

 

Stages of Change

socially-responsible

 

While consulting I often encounter employee issues that tend to arise as changes are introduced into an organization. Change management has always been an issue of debate among scholars: How can employers create suitable conditions for a successful change process? And what can employees do to get through it?
By nature, human beings tend to resent change and resist it strongly. The whole process can be very distressing to employees and negative emotions (or reactions) could stem out of it. It is very important to recognize the different stages of change and anticipate the impact in order to take preventative measures.
1. Denial: employees fight it and strive to defend their status-quo at this stage.
2. Anger: employees realize they cannot possibly avoid the new occurring and organizational change. Insecurity, lack of self-esteem and chaos are the main highlights of this stage.
3. Dejection: By this stage employees have realized they cannot have the old ways back and they have no other choice but to let go of them. The anger is now translated into remorse and despair.
4. Acceptance: This happens when employees are finally acknowledging the fact that this change is bound to happen. They are now starting to reflect on the new ways and removing old hurdles from their way.
5. Learning and Development: This takes place when employees finally realize that this change could actually improve their upcoming prospects and decide to focus their efforts in absorbing it and moving forward.
As you are implementing changes, consider these stages and allow employees to move through them. The end result with be better for everyone!

 

DD-Queen-of-Loyalty-2011

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s Time to Get R.E.A.L.”

 

Leadership and the Art of Struggle

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Leadership is often a struggle.  Often leaders feel they are supposed to be perfect or at least perfectly capable of dealing with struggle.  But, of course, no leader is perfect.  All human beings have their own unique flaws and frailties.  And, struggle is a natural part of leadership. 

 

Instead of denying struggle, or feeling some degree of shame, Steven Snyder in Leadership and the Art of Struggle explains how savvy leaders embrace struggle as an opportunity for growth and learning, as an art to be mastered.  They come to see struggle as a universal rite of passage without allowing themselves to become mired in it. 

 

There are three fundamental conditions that determine the nature of the struggle and serve as its defining elements:

 

  1. Change.  Every struggle is triggered by some type of change.  External change always carries with it seeds of opportunity and growth.  The struggle may come from discerning the best way to take advantage of those opportunities or how to do so with limited resources.  In other cases, change comes from deep within a leader’s inner world.  As the heart and the mind expand to take in new ideas, feelings and perspectives, struggle comes from the process of clarifying newly emerging values and identity.
  2. Tensions. The process of change creates a natural set of tensions. Tension points stem from individual and institutional traditions (past) and aspirations (future) as well as (outward) relationships and (inward) identity.
  3. Being out of balance.  All leaders need some way to anchor and balance themselves in times of turbulence when forces beyond their control begin swirling around them with chaotic intensity.  Leaders use a variety of practices to remain centered and grounded, including:
  • Diet and exercise
  • Connecting with something greater than themselves
  • Deeply connecting with nature
  • Journaling
  • Their own unique blend of these practices and others

              

               One particular practice seems to function on a higher plane, transcending these other more traditional approaches.  This is the practice of mindfulness.  The central focus is self-awareness.  Through the practice of mindfulness, we learn to objectively observe ourselves during stressful situations – as if both experiencing the situation and simultaneously watching ourselves.  The simple reflective act of naming our emotions as we experience them grants us a new power to more intentionally choose how we respond.

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As you grow in your leadership role, navigating the struggle will elevate your leadership success.  Dianne Durkin of Loyalty Factor has years of experience mentoring leaders as they navigate various struggles in their career.  For more information or to engage Dianne Durkin, contact Loyalty Factor at 603.334.3401.

An Employee Would Work an Extra Week for an Incentive Program

CommunicatingEmployees Would Work an Extra Week for an Incentive Program

Staples Advantage, the business-to-business division of Staples, Inc., released the results of a survey that found one-third of office workers would be willing to put in an extra week of work each year if it meant their company would implement an incentive program. Respondents at companies that already have such programs say they are:

• More Valued (85%)
• Happier and More Motivated at Work (70%)
• More Loyal to their Company (65%)
• More Productive and able to get Better Results (60%)

A staggering 70% of employees at companies without incentive programs say they’d love to work for a company that has one. In addition to working an extra week each year, these employees would be willing to make other sacrifices if it meant their company would implement an incentive program – 30% say they would take on extra responsibilities, and more than 40% would be in favor of forgoing the annual holiday party.

What is your organization doing to implement incentive programs? For help in implementing creative, cost effective programs, contact Loyalty Factor at 603-334-3401.

ESM: Engagement Strategies Magazine, Nov/Dec 2011

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Dianne Durkin is president and founder of Loyalty Factor, a specialized consulting and training company that enhances employee, customer and brand loyalty for some of the nation’s most prominent corporations and many smaller businesses. Durkin has over 25 years experience in finance, direct sales, international marketing and training and development.

Dianne’s proven expertise lies in helping companies quickly get to the core issues and outlining their impact on the organization’s profits, productivity and people. She authored “The Loyalty Factor: Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty,” and the newly released “The Power of Magnetic Leadership: It’s Time to Get R.E.A.L.”